Thrivelogo

Movement and Fitness

The secret of getting ahead is getting started.

— Mark Twain

Thrive Global Signature Protocol

Come Into the Present Moment

To be in the present moment

(Preferably done with closed eyes, but can be done with eyes open)


  1. Simply become aware of the rising and the falling of your breath (3 breaths)

  2. Now allow yourself to receive the breath. Don't take the breath in, receive it. (Realize the breath is a gift. We have done nothing to earn our breath). So we receive it and then let go of it. (The breath is the perfect metaphor for life: we have to let go - create space - in order to receive).(3 breaths)

  3. We now feel the wave of the breath throughout our whole body. When our breath moves, our whole body moves. We can feel this as a wave. (3 breaths) (We may need to adjust our body position to experience this - in other words it is more difficult if we are slumping or have our legs crossed.) (Can be done at anytime during the day as a mini-break).

share
Movement and Fitness

Your key to movement health is movement variability.

That means move your body in as many healthy ways as possible, and move as much as possible during the day -- particularly if you are in a sedentary job.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Take a walking meeting.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Walk around the block during your lunch break.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Alternate between standing and sitting during the day.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Get off the elevator one floor below your destination and walk the stairs.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Get off the subway one stop before your destination and walk a few blocks.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Park the car at farthest end of the parking lot.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Do some gentle movements and stretching at your desk.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Gently rotate your body with subtle micro-twists, move side-to-side (laterally), and forward and back.

Build your own 2-minute sequence of this and practice it regularly.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Take calls at work standing up or walking around the office.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Set a daily step goal.

10,000 is the general recommendation.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Set an alert for every 20 minutes to stand up and move.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Jack your heart rate up 50%

above your resting baseline

for at least fifteen minutes every day.

Learn More share
On average, there are 100 billion neurons in each of our brains, and they love a good physical workout.

Studies now show that older people who still do vigorous exercise, play competitive sports, or just walk several times a week protect their brain's white matter from shrinking.

So if you plan to have a superbly functioning brain in your golden years, and dodge the evils of senility and Alzheimer's disease, then commit to an exercise routine.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Sit and stand up straight. Maintaining correct posture may be one of the best-kept secrets for achieving a longer, healthier, and more enjoyable life.

We know that poor posture can lead to a wide assortment of neck and back problems. It is often caused by a weak core, which is one of the primary risk factors for back problems— at every age.

Poor posture can also cause headaches, TMJ, arthritis, poor circulation, muscle aches, difficulty breathing, indigestion, constipation, joint stiffness, fatigue, neurological problems, and poor physical function in general.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Find out what exercise or activity you're bad at and focus on it.

Always fall over during tree pose? Make tree pose a daily exercise.

Learn More share
Movement and Fitness

Watch your habits,

for they become your posture.

Watch your posture,

for it creates your boundaries.

Watch your boundaries,

for they restrict your growth.

Watch your restrictions,

for they create immobility.

Watch your immobility,

for it becomes your illness.

by Katy Bowman

share
Movement and Fitness

For those who simply want to improve their mobility and overall health by, for example, walking, it's also important to vary your movement. Take a different route, find an uneven path to stimulate your sense of balance. Jog for a block and then return to walking! It's easy to get stuck in the repetitive movements of today's society: sitting with eyes straight ahead, driving, working at a computer. These repetitive, "stuck" postures are the source of back, neck, shoulder, hip and knee pain. It's critical that we remind our muscles that they can move in varied ways - bending, reaching, twisting, rotating, pulling, pushing.

by Martha Peterson

share
Movement and Fitness

Every single thing our bodies do requires movement—initiated by our musculoskeletal system—to be performed with ease. Digestion, immunity, reproduction—all of these functions require us to move. You can eat the perfect diet, sleep eight hours a night, and use only baking soda and vinegar to clean your house, but without the loads created by natural movement, all of these worthy efforts are thwarted on a cellular level, and your optimal wellness level remains elusive.

by Katy Bowman

share
Movement and Fitness

People are amazed that simply doing more of what you don't normally do can increase motor control, strength, and athletic ability.

One of the reasons this works so well is because movement variation stimulates the brain with new and different sensory feedback. The result is improved motor output. You improve your overall movement and strength without having to push harder.

This doesn't just apply to movement; it applies to life: the way in which we live our lives shows up in our bodies. Give yourself permission to explore new ways of solving life's problems and suddenly, often with less struggle, those problems sometimes solve themselves.

by Martha Peterson

share