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Nutrition

Don’t Eat Anything Your Great Grandmother Wouldn’t Recognize as Food. Eat Only Foods That Have Been Cooked by Humans. Eat All the Junk Food You Want as Long as You Cook It Yourself.

— Michael Pollan

Thrive Global Signature Protocol

Come Into the Present Moment

To be in the present moment

(Preferably done with closed eyes, but can be done with eyes open)


  1. Simply become aware of the rising and the falling of your breath (3 breaths)

  2. Now allow yourself to receive the breath. Don't take the breath in, receive it. (Realize the breath is a gift. We have done nothing to earn our breath). So we receive it and then let go of it. (The breath is the perfect metaphor for life: we have to let go - create space - in order to receive).(3 breaths)

  3. We now feel the wave of the breath throughout our whole body. When our breath moves, our whole body moves. We can feel this as a wave. (3 breaths) (We may need to adjust our body position to experience this - in other words it is more difficult if we are slumping or have our legs crossed.) (Can be done at anytime during the day as a mini-break).

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Nutrition

Take a microstep to reduce your refined and added sugar.

And then take another microstep...and another...and another...until your refined sugar is down to zero.

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Nutrition

Experiment with finding

healthy substitutes.

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Nutrition

Keep a healthy snack in your bag

to prevent impulse junk food eating

when you get hungry.

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Nutrition

Educate yourself about your microbiome--key to good digestion and overall health.

Ask your health practitioner about it at your next visit.

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Nutrition

Leave as much time as you can between your nighttime meal and breakfast the next morning to enable your body to detoxify and rest.

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Nutrition

Eat real food, and find healthy substitutions for the processed foods you are eliminating.

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Nutrition

If you don’t normally snack at 3: 00 p.m. every single day, then don’t reach for that apple fritter to lift your late-afternoon lull.

But if you need an afternoon snack, have it at a regular time. And go for a handful of nuts, a piece of whole fruit, veggies dipped in hummus, or some cheese and crackers rather than the processed fried dough.

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Nutrition

If you ask yourself "What should I eat?," the answer is real food. What constitutes real food? With the exception of flash-frozen fruits and vegetables, anything that doesn’t come with a label or an FDA-approved nutrition facts label is likely to be real, as ironic as that sounds.

If you walk the perimeter of your grocery store (produce section, butcher, fishmonger), you’ll find real food. Steer clear of those aisles lined with boxes and bottles and other food impostors that come in pretty packages.

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Nutrition

If a food product has to tell you that it’s good for you (with descriptions and health claims on their packaging that say things like “low fat!” “low in sugar!” “lite,” “cholesterol free!” “baked not fried,” “antioxidant rich,” and “all natural”), then it’s probably not very real.

If they have to tell you why you should be eating it, you shouldn’t be eating it.

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Nutrition

Go for seasonal items when you buy fresh produce. The minute a fruit or vegetable is picked is the moment it starts to change chemically and lose nutritional value.

Too many fruits and vegetables are available year-round now thanks to shipping technologies.

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Nutrition

You can learn all the information you need to make smart purchases just by chatting up your local grocer.

The people who stock the produce section, for instance, will tell you what just came in, where it came from, and how it was farmed. The guy manning the butcher counter can share details about the ranchers who supplied the meat, and the woman behind the fish counter can offer information as to which fish is the freshest, most sustainably caught.

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Nutrition

Farmers markets rarely sell imported items, so what you find there will be the freshest possible.

If you can buy most of your fresh produce from a local farmers market, you can automatically avoid the nutrient-poor, processed, nonseasonal fare.

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Nutrition

Grow a garden. Don’t panic if you live in an itty-bitty apartment or lack a green thumb. Be willing to experiment and start with easy plants that work in your climate and space.

You needn’t own an acre or have a huge amount of unused area in your yard. A simple window box will suffice. And you can just start by growing herbs and spices Make this a community effort and join forces with neighbors.

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Nutrition

Borrow a recipe from around the world, buy fresh ingredients, and cook it for yourself.

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Nutrition

Cold-water fish, such as salmon, sardines, tuna, trout, anchovies, herring, halibut, cod, black cod, mackerel, and mahi-mahi are excellent sources of high-quality protein, healthy fats, and naturally occurring vitamins and minerals.

Aim to eat cold-water fish a minimum of three times per week. Skip fish high in mercury and anything from dirty waters.

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Nutrition

There is convincing evidence that eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day can help prevent chronic diseases, not to mention decrease one’s risk for obesity.

But most people consume less than two cups of fruits and veggies a day, far below the four to six cups we should be getting. So eat up, and if you’re going to favor one type of produce over the other, go for more leafy greens and fibrous vegetables than sugary fruit.

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Nutrition

Fill your plate with many colors, as nature segregates nutrients by color; the blend of nutrients that makes a carrot orange is different from the blend that makes broccoli green, but they both are needed to support health.

To maximize the number of different nutrients you consume, you’re better off eating a yellow bell pepper and a red one than eating two of a single color.

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Nutrition

Don’t Eat Anything Your Great Grandmother Wouldn’t Recognize as Food. Eat Only Foods That Have Been Cooked by Humans. Eat All the Junk Food You Want as Long as You Cook It Yourself.

by Michael Pollan

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Nutrition

The science tells us that obesity is ultimately the result of a hormonal imbalance, not a caloric one—specifically, the stimulation of insulin secretion caused by eating easily digestible, carbohydrate-rich foods: refined carbohydrates, including flour and cereal grains, starchy vegetables such as potatoes, and sugars, like sucrose (table sugar) and high-fructose corn syrup. These carbohydrates literally make us fat, and by driving us to accumulate fat, they make us hungrier and they make us sedentary.

by Gary Taubes

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Nutrition

Eat More Like the French. Or the Japanese. Or the Italians. Or the Greeks.

by Michael Pollan

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